Summer 2015 eNewsletter

Summer 2015 eNewsletter

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Latest News from the Office of Sponsored Projects

Senior Director's Message

Paul Estabrooks, Ph.D.

Before I get going on the main topic of my update for the newsletter, I’d like to officially welcome all our Jefferson College of Health Sciences (JCHS) faculty and staff as partners of the Carilion Clinic Research and Development newsletter. This is our first attempt to combine research information and ideas that have been going out in two separate newsletters. It also continues the great progress we made combining our Research Day efforts this year. That partnership which also included the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine led to one of our most successful Research Days to-date from a record number of over 300 participants to a series of high-quality scientific presentations from our students, residents, pharmacists, physicians, and nurses! Details about Research Day can be found in the summary article in this newsletter.

That is a great segue into the theme of today’s message… our ongoing efforts to support high-quality research to promote excellence in the quality of care provided to our patients.

Currently, strong research programs exist across a number of Carilion Clinic departments. In addition to a small, but dedicated group of physicians, nurses, and other providers engaged in research, contributions to the research endeavor are also made by residents, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine students, and students in professional programs at(JCHS). Carilion Clinic is also involved as a subcontractor on a number of federal grants and contracts and enjoys a developing partnership with researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and School of Medicine. Finally, Carilion physicians participate as site leads for a variety of industry sponsored clinical trials that engage new patients and provide our current patients with opportunities to receive new and innovative treatments.

While there are a lot of good things going on with Carilion Clinic Research, much of our research infrastructure has developed organically to address needs within the system. For example, (1) the Carilion Clinic Security Governance Committee was developed (originally) to monitor research access to protected health information; (2) the Carilion Clinic Research and Development approval process was developed to ensure department chairs were aware of the research projects and the time allocated by physician investigators; and (3) the MyTSC research request process was developed to ensure that investigators were obtaining the appropriate approvals to obtain data and conduct specific analyses. These groups and processes, while unquestionably valuable, often result in lengthy delays for researchers within the system—often before and after IRB review.

To address the sometimes protracted review time and investigator frustration with unanticipated delays, we have been working on the research review process to provide timely reviews of research projects in the areas of scientific quality, feasibility of data acquisition and analyses, feasibility of research time and personnel requests, and procedures for accessing protected health information.

Our goal is to develop a ‘one-stop-shop’ for research review and approvals prior to having a study reviewed by the IRB. That ‘shop’ would identify issues with analytic feasibility (i.e., do the data exist and can they feasibility be acquired), human resource needs, protection of personal health information, and scientific quality at the beginning of the process—and provide actionable feedback for projects that need attention.

We are still early in this process and are looking for feedback on our ideas and ideas of your own that can help us improve the quality of our work and efficiency of our research enterprise.

Another endeavor we are undertaking is the revamping of our internal and external websites.  Our goal is to make it informative, easy to navigate, and more user-friendly by the end of the fiscal year (September 2015).  We welcome any comments/suggestions you may have to help us enhance the Research & Development website.  If you have comments/suggestions regarding the websites, please send them to research@carilionclinic.org.

Feel free to reach out to me with your ideas and to volunteer to help out!

Cheers,

Paul

Featured Researcher

 

Dario Sorrentino, M.D., FRACP
Professor of Medicine - Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
Director, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Division of Gastroenterology - Carilion Clinic
Adjunct Professor - Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

Background

Dr. Sorrentino earned his medical degree in 1982 from the University of Sassari Medical School in Italy where he also completed the Internship and a Fellowship in Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy in 1987.

He also has spent time as a Research Fellow at the Gastroenterology and Liver Unit of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). After attaining his specialization credentials in Gastroenterology, he was appointed Assistant Professor at Mount Sinai Medical School, New York City in the Divisions of Liver Diseases and Gastroenterology and spent seven years in that position.

He then returned to Italy to the University of Udine Medical School. There he managed the Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit of the University Hospital, was later appointed Associate Professor of Medicine and Gastroenterology, became the Chair of Gastroenterology, and served as the Director of the Fellowship Program in Gastroenterology.

From 2010 to 2013, he was Professor of Medicine at the University of Queensland and staff Gastroenterologist at Nambour Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. He returned to the US in 2013. 

He is well published in many prestigious peer reviewed journals such as the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Gastroenterology, Hepatology,  the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine, to name a few. He has served as an Editorial Board member of various specialty journals and acted as a referee for several major gastroenterology and hepatology journals and many funding agencies including the NIH. He is currently a member of the American Gastroenterological Association International Committee.

What is your research past? Focus area/interest?

During the time I spent at UCSF and Mount Sinai, I conducted very basic studies in cellular membrane transport and clarified some crucial aspects of the uptake of bilirubin and fatty acids by several cell types as well as the ligand-albumin interaction.

Upon my return to Italy, my interests focused on H.pylori infection and autoimmune and neoplastic diseases affecting the GI tract.

During the past several years, I have conducted research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). My team and I have shown for the first time that the anti-TNF agent infliximab appears to completely prevent post-surgical recurrence of Crohn’s disease. Those findings have been widely replicated worldwide and have changed the therapeutic approach to this condition. We have also proposed an innovative, long-term strategy involving an individualized drug dose titration protocol in patients in remission with such medication after surgery.

What is your current role here at Carilion? In terms of research?

I am an attending gastroenterologist within the GI division under the direction of Paul Yeaton, M.D. I tend to patients with IBD. Since I came to Carilion Clinic two years ago, I have managed the newly created IBD Center – working with the surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, and pediatric gastroenterologists who also have an interest in patients afflicted with IBD. Drs. Marrieth Rubio, Vu Nguyen, and Rachel White, RN are also part of the team.

We formed a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team that meets often to discuss our most challenging patients.  During these meetings, we plan management strategies and therapies for our patients, discuss ongoing progress in the field, and propose new research projects.

In a short time, our team has been able to attract a large patient population who, in the past, found it necessary to travel elsewhere for cutting edge therapies in this area of medical care. Our team is spearheading treatments and care that prove beneficial to those suffering from IBD and will hopefully, make a medical-mark within our community, Virginia, and beyond. The entire Carilion medical community has been very supportive of this program and I am very thankful for that.

In terms of research, I clearly see a need to focus on IBD for our community and beyond.  I have attracted the first major GI clinical trials in the area and plan to conduct many research projects both clinical and in collaboration with basic scientists at Virginia Tech, and potential industry sponsors.

What made you want to come to Carilion?

Roanoke is an attractive and friendly place for a young family like mine. Carilion Clinic is a an institution with great potential to grow, serves a very large population, has excellent facilities, and is focused on providing positive outcomes for its patients. I always wanted to return to the US after experiences in different countries.

Most importantly, I was convinced by the dedication and vision of Dr. Paul Yeaton, who created the GI division from scratch and is working hard to give it a strong academic connotation, that I could play a valuable role in helping develop this medical area and bring expertise to this division through my past experiences.

Can you tell us a bit about your current and pending projects you have here?

My research as well as my clinical activity focuses on IBD. We have three upcoming new clinical trials testing new medications for patients with aggressive Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis who have failed or are intolerant to biologics. Together with James Boone of TechLab and Kristin Knight, manager of the Carilion Research Lab, we have ongoing projects aimed at testing novel markers of inflammation in different clinical scenarios to diagnose IBD and monitor the response to treatment. We are also collaborating with other specialists (oncologists, rheumatologists, dermatologists, and gynecologists) to better identify the risks posed by currently used medications in IBD or monitor disease evolution under specific circumstances.

My colleagues and I have also submitted major grant applications to secure funds to study the basic causes and pathogenesis of the disease; to explore innovative approaches for the long term therapy with biologics in Crohn’s disease; and to improve the chances of early diagnosis of Crohn’s disease – an approach that will likely lead to a much better response to therapy.

One major project to highlight:

The project I would like to discuss is the diagnosis of pre-clinical Crohn’s disease. This research focuses on asymptomatic individuals - first degree relatives of Crohn’s disease patients - at a stage in which inflammation has caused little or no damage to the intestine and other organs.

We have conducted a preliminary study and published the results last year which show that it is possible to diagnose the disease at a very early stage and - by acting on it - possibly preventing its most serious consequences.

We would like to reproduce these results on a much larger scale in a nationwide study coordinated by us and involving several top IBD centers in the country – including Chicago, New York, Washington DC, Philadelphia, and Dallas. Such a study will bring huge benefits to the patients.

Currently, the disease is diagnosed too late – when extensive damage is already present and a large proportion of patients either do not respond to therapy or will need surgery. With this study, we hope to reproduce what has already been done for e.g. liver disease and diabetes – describing the natural history of Crohn’s disease from its onset and by way of early intervention avoiding severe complications.

Hopefully in this study, we will also be able to identify non-invasive markers that can be used to screen the general population for Crohn’s disease. By contrast to what many think, there is no such test available today. In this study, we also hope to elucidate the most crucial aspects of the causes and evolution of the disease, and provide the basis for its definite cure. If we are able to secure the necessary funding and to conduct and coordinate the study at Carilion, such research will bring immense benefit to the community – not only in terms of acquisition of clinical knowledge but also in terms of national and international prestige.

What is your vision for research here – in your department and here at Carilion as a whole?

Research is a fundamental part of medicine. As a physician, you can see and treat 10-20 patients in one day. Through research, you can find solutions to unmet medical needs and alleviate the suffering of many more people worldwide.

In addition, research hones a physician's clinical skills - you use more accurate problem-solving tools, and you are aware of the latest developments in the field. From research you learn the finest techniques of communication - which are crucial to convey difficult concepts to patients and to other health care providers. 

Hence, engaging in research improves the quality of health care and enhances the image and prestige of the institution – a crucial factor to attract bright people to continue our endeavours and positive outcomes for our patients. At Carilion, we have a large patient population, excellent clinical staff and facilities, and the great opportunity to collaborate with top scientists at Virginia Tech.  Combining these building blocks to create a top academic medical center will take time and vision but I have no doubt that our leadership will drive this process into the right direction.

How do you see clinical trials impacting public health? How can this assist Roanoke?

Clinical trials are essential for the progress of medicine.

They are the last step in a long process initiated in the lab with the discovery of a molecule and the testing in animals. They are the ultimate translation of science into medicine.

Clinical trials offer hope to many patients who do not respond to standard medications. In addition even when they fail they teach us a great deal about the disease process.

Overall, without trials there would be no safe and effective medications developed for those in need and there would be no substantial progress in clinical medicine.

I believe Carilion has what it takes to attract major, high quality international trials. A major effort should be made to build and expand on the existing experience and make this an institutional priority. Our patients should be given the best that health care has to offer today.

 

IMPACT Grant Awarded to Wilton Kennedy, Ph.D. (JCHS)

Dr. Wilton Kennedy, Associate Professor in Jefferson College's Physician Assistant Program, has been awarded an IMPACT grant from the Physician Assistant Foundation. The project, "Overcoming Vaccine Hesitancy Through Motivational Interviewing," seeks to motivate unvaccinated patients and caregivers with personal misconceptions and false beliefs to increase their intent to receive needed immunizations by training PAs in Motivational Interviewing (MI).

Many well-meaning providers, public health advocates and educators mistake vaccine refusal with a lack of vaccine knowledge. However, many vaccine refusers are well-educated and familiar with indications for vaccines, yet decline vaccines for other reasons. Instead of approaching these patients with a litany of knowledge-based facts for receiving vaccines, we will demonstrate an approach utilizing MI to change behavior among patients and providers.

The project will produce a series of videos utilizing standardized patients with 6 different scenarios seen in clinical encounters with vaccine refusers. Each video will consist of the current standard approach to persuading a patient and then an approach utilizing evidence-based Motivational Interviewing techniques. The peer reviewed, scripted, professional videos will be incorporated into online modules to allow for easy access for practicing PAs and PA students. In addition to the videotaped encounter, each module will include detailed information regarding the current literature and best practices for the unique scenarios, such as background, typical cohorts of patient examples, and bullet points for easy recall. Modules will be uploaded and linked to the AAPA website. Pre- and post-tests and a self-evaluation of the provider’s current practice will be incorporated for VCME consideration and as a part of ongoing performance improvement and self-evaluation.

The research and project implementation team will also involve Dr. Judy Cusumano (Jefferson College Physician Assistant Program), Dr. Diana Willeman-Buckelew (Jefferson College Department of Community Health Sciences), Luke Swatzyna (Carilion Clinic, Emergency Medicine), Elizabeth Sawyer (VTCSoM, Clinical Sciences/Standardized Patient Program), and Dr. Denise Rizzolo (Seton Hall, Physician Assistant Program).

 

Virginia Blood Foundation Grant

A Carilion Clinic/VTC team has been awarded a two year grant in the amount of $122,362 from the Virginia Blood Foundation, Glen Allen, VA.  The project title is   Assessment of a Continuing Medical Education Intervention Designed to Change Physician Practice Regarding Blood Transfusion.  The Principal Investigator for the grant is A. Paul Dallas, MD, Department of Internal Medicine.  Other project team members include David W. Musick, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine; Shari A. Whicker, EdD, Department of Interprofessionalism; Tim Auwarter, MBA, Vice-President of Clinical Support; and Evangeline Arulraja, second year medical student, VTC School of Medicine.  The project will also be supported by the Office of Continuing Professional Development, Division of Continuing Medical Education.

This two-year project will assess the impact of a multi-phased continuing medical education (CME) intervention designed to educate physicians across specialties concerning best-practices transfusion medicine.  The research question to be addressed in the proposed project is:  can a multi-faceted CME-based educational program impact physician transfusion practices in an academic Level One trauma center, so that the percentage of inappropriate transfusions is decreased significantly?

Transfusion of blood and blood products is of critical importance in patient care and has become a nationwide concern to health care providers as well as patients.  Transfusion represents a clinical activity of high volume and significant cost to the health care system.  “Patient blood management” is best described as “an evidence-based approach to optimizing the care of patients who might need transfusion”1.  The clinical practice of transfusion therapy is not clear-cut, and remains subject to controversy in terms of best-practices as well as inherent risks to patients (e.g., infection, contamination, transfusion reactions, alteration of immune function/immune suppression).  There is an urgent need to educate physicians and other health care providers concerning best-evidence transfusion practices, yet very few trials of continuing medical education interventions on this issue have occurred.  Ensuring that patients receive appropriate transfusions also has a positive impact on community blood supply, thus ensuring that blood is more available on critical occasions.

Primary outcomes to be measured include physician participation in and satisfaction with targeted CME activities; self-reported knowledge gains by physicians; and percentage of appropriate versus inappropriate transfusion orders (including subset of percentage of orders with no supporting indication provided).  Secondary outcomes will include blood product utilization rates; cost savings associated with changes in transfusion patterns; patient length of stay; long-term patient morbidity/secondary diagnoses; and long-term, all cause patient mortality.

For more information:  Dr. A. Paul Dallas, apdallas@carilionclinic.org; Dr. David Musick, dwmusick@carilionclinic.org.

1Definitions and Concepts in Patient Blood Management.American Association of Blood Banks.  URL: http://www.aabb.org/pbm/Pages/definitionsconcepts.aspx.  Accessed November 5, 2014.

 

JCHS Scholarly Activity Presentations

January 1, 2015 - May 31, 2015

Arts and Sciences

Carliss, Richard D.

Demonstration

  • Local
  • Carliss, R. D. "Paloxin," Demonstration presented at: Carilion Business Development, JCHS, JCHS.

Oral Presentation

  • National
  • Carliss, R. D. "Genotoxicity Grant Application," Oral Presentation presented at: Scientific Board Meeting, Trinity Laboratories, Inc., San Antonio, TX.

Poster

  • Local
  • Carliss, R. D. "Development of Immunodiagnostic Marker for Pseudomonas aeruginosa," Poster presented at: Carilion-JCHS Research Day 2013.

Poster

  • Local
  • Carliss, R. D. "Molecular Organization of β-lactamase Gene and Insertion Sequences in     Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii," Poster presented at: Carilion-JCHS     Research Day 2013, JCHS, JCHS.

 

Dane, Francis C.

Poster

  • International
  • Patel, D. S., Devereaux, R. S., Teaford, H. G., Dane, F. C., Parish, D. C., Waring, M. E., & Kiefe, C. I., (2015, April 29). "Medication adherence improves shortly after acute coronary syndrome admission and then declines over one year: Findings from TRACE-CORE," Poster presented at: Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke 2015 Scientific Sessions, American Heart Associatino & American Stroke Association, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

 

Dunn, Ashleigh P.

Oral Presentation

  • Local
  • Dunn, A., (2015, January 6). "," Oral Presentation presented at: Arts and Sciences Scholarship Forum, JCHS, JCHS.

 

 

Farrell PhD, Francis X.

Keynote/Plenary Address

  • Local
  • Farrell, F. X. "Biotherapeutics: Designing Novel Molecules to Treat Chronic Diseases," Keynote/Plenary Address presented at: 2013 BioSymposium, James Madison University, Harrisonburg VA.

 

McNamara, John P.

Poster

  • Regional
  • McNamara, J. P., & Tousman, S. A., (2015, February 6). "Interprofessional Education: How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate and Graduate," Poster presented at: CIDER, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg.

 

Price, Jamie B.

Oral Presentation

  • State
  • Price, J. B., & Moore, E. H. "Workshops for the Common Good:  Developing and Implementing a Successful Learning Commons Academic Skills Workshop Series," Oral Presentation presented at: Virginia Library Assocation, VLACRL - Virginia Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries, Portsmouth, VA.

Oral Presentation

  • State
  • Price, J. B., & Moore, E. H. "Workshopping for Success:  Investing Resources in a Workshop Series to Maximize Benefits of Academic Support Services," Oral Presentation presented at: Virginia Library Association, Virginia Library Association Research and College Libraries Chapter, Portsmouth, VA.

 

Steer, George A.

Oral Presentation

  • International
  • Steer, G. A. "Exhaled Carbon Dioxide, the Underutilized Vital Sign," Oral Presentation presented at: Smart Monitoring, Resuscitation Research Laboratory UTMB Military Health System Research Symposium, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Poster

  • International
  • Steer, G. A., Jones, S., Airey, P. J., Staykova, M. P., & Poulsen, C. R. "Effects of an Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Activity on Student Confidence Levels of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Skills," Poster presented at: American Association for Respiratory Care 57th International Congress, American Association for Respiratory Care, Tampa, FL.

 

Tousman, Stuart A. (Full Professor)

Poster

  • Regional
  • McNamara, J. P., & Tousman, S. A., (2015, February 6). "Interprofessional Education:      How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate            and Graduate," Poster presented at: CIDER, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg.

 

Watson, Courtney D.

Paper

  • International
  • Watson, C. D., (2015, February). "Bottoms Up: Literary Libations and Other Culinary Adventures in Southern Tourism," Paper presented at: Southern Humanities Conference, Southern Humanities Council/ College of St. Rose, Athens, Georgia.

 

Community Health Sciences

 

Airey, Patricia J.

Poster

  • International
  • Steer, G. A., Jones, S., Airey, P. J., Staykova, M. P., & Poulsen, C. R. "Effects of an Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Activity on Student Confidence Levels of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Skills," Poster presented at: American Association for Respiratory Care 57th International Congress, American Association for Respiratory Care, Tampa, FL.

 

Peerman, Carey H. (Assistant Professor)

Oral Presentation

  • Local
  • Peerman, C. H., (2015, February). "Health & Eating," Oral Presentation, Christiansburg Rec Center, Christiansburg.

 

  • Regional
  • Peerman, C. H., (2015, March 18). "Future Trends in Healthcare," Oral Presentation presented at: Senior Networking Expo, Senior Networking Group, Blacksburg.

 

  • Regional
  • Peerman, C. H., (2015, January 13). "Health and Hygiene," Oral Presentation, Christiansburg Recreation Center, Christiansburg.

 

Poulsen, Chase R.

Poster

  • International
  • Steer, G. A., Jones, S., Airey, P. J., Staykova, M. P., & Poulsen, C. R. "Effects of an Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Activity on Student Confidence Levels of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Skills," Poster presented at: American Association for Respiratory Care 57th International Congress, American Association for Respiratory Care, Tampa, FL.

 

Willeman-Buckelew, Diana L. (Associate Professor)

Oral Presentation

  • Local
  • Willeman, D. L. "Relationship between knowledge, perceived risk and influenza vaccine     uptake in health science students," Oral Presentation presented at: JCHS Research Finale, JCHS, Roanoke, VA.

Nursing

Anderson, Martha S.

Oral Presentation

  • National
  • Anderson, M. "Relocation of Older Adults and Transitions," Oral Presentation presented at: Gerontological Society of America (accepted), GSA, San Diego, CA. (accepted, did not attend).

 

Clark, Warren G.

Poster

  • Local
  • Clark, W. G. "Preventing Violence in Behavioral Health, An Evidence-Based Practice Project," Poster presented at: Carilion Nurses Day, Carilion Clinic, RMH Conference Room.

 

Foti, Denise D.

Oral Presentation

  • Local
  • Foti, D. D. "Leading Change Agent: The ABSN Bridge to Professional Nursing Practice,"Oral Presentation presented at: Promotion Presentation, JCHS.

 

Greer, Rebecca M.

Oral Presentation

  • Local
  • Greer, R. M. "Cultural Assessment," Oral Presentation presented at: Nursing Faculty Development, JCHS, Roanoke, VA.

 

Hartman, Ann M.

Poster

  • National
  • Rickabaugh, L. R., & Hartman, A. M. "Influence of Cultural Immersion on Spirituality," Poster presented at: Striving for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing Education, 12th Annual Nurse Educator Institute, Branson, Missouri.

 

Jones, Susan G.

Poster

  • International
  • Steer, G. A., Jones, S., Airey, P. J., Staykova, M. P., & Poulsen, C. R. "Effects of an Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Activity on Student Confidence Levels of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Skills," Poster presented at: American Association for Respiratory Care 57th International Congress, American Association for Respiratory Care, Tampa, FL.

Marcum, Cynthia R.

Poster

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD.

 

Murray, Rhoda R.

Poster

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD.

 

Rickabaugh, Linda R.

Poster

  • National
  • Rickabaugh, L. R., & Hartman, A. M. "Influence of Cultural Immersion on Spirituality," Poster presented at: Striving for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing Education, 12th Annual Nurse Educator Institute, Branson, Missouri.

 

Scruggs Garber, Jeannie Scruggs

Poster

  • National
  • Garber, J. S., Webster, C., Allison-Jones, L., & Clark, R. C. "Collaborating to Transform   Nursing Care through Practice," Poster presented at: 2007 Nurse Faculty/ Nurse Executive Summit, Scottsdale, AZ.

 

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD.

 

Staykova, Milena P. (Associate Professor)

Poster

  • International
  • Steer, G. A., Jones, S., Airey, P. J., Staykova, M. P., & Poulsen, C. R. "Effects of an Interprofessional Clinical Simulation Activity on Student Confidence Levels of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Skills," Poster presented at: American Association for Respiratory Care 57th International Congress, American Association for Respiratory Care, Tampa, FL.

 

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD. 

 

Vari, Patty M.

Poster

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD.

 

Vishneski, Sonia M.

Poster

  • National
  • Staykova, M. P., Murray, R. R., Garber, J. S., Marcum, C. R., Vishneski, S. M., & Vari, P. M., (2015, April 26). "How smart are the students applying for graduate education: Writing assessment," Poster presented at: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Baltimore, MD.

 

 

Rehabilitation and Wellness

 

Browning, Jason T.

Oral Presentation

  • State
  • Rai, G. A., Browning, J. T., & Emerick-Brothers, J., (2015, March 13). "Handwriting Intervention: A Review of Best Practice," Oral Presentation presented at: 2015 School System Symposium: Innovative Intervention to Support Student Participation, VAOTA, Winchester, Virginia.

 

Krackow, Michael S.

Continuing Education Seminar

  • National
  • Krackow, M. S. "6-hour continuing education seminar," Other presented at: Functional Fitness After 40, Cross-Country Education Inc. LLC, Atlanta, GA; Birmingham, AL: Edison, NJ: Pramus, NJ; Columbia, SC; Charlotte, NC; Milwaukee, WE,:; Appleton, WE; Chicago, IL; Bloomington, IL.

 

Layman, Karen F.

Other

  • State
  • Layman, K. F. "A Closer Look at the New Fieldwork Evaluation Form," Other presented at: VOTA State Conference 2003, Virginia Occupational Therapy Association, Richmond, VA.

 

Polich, Susan M.

Poster

  • Regional
  • Polich, S. M., (2015, February 5). "The Effect of a Video Training Module on Students’ Beliefs About Academically Dishonest Actions"," Poster presented at: CIDER, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

 

Rai, Gillian A.

Oral Presentation

  • State
  • Rai, G. A., Browning, J. T., & Emerick-Brothers, J., (2015, March 13). "Handwriting Intervention: A Review of Best Practice," Oral Presentation presented at: 2015 School System Symposium: Innovative Intervention to Support Student Participation, VAOTA, Winchester, Virginia.

 

College Administration

 

Allison-Jones, Lisa

Poster

  • National
  • Garber, J. S., Webster, C., Allison-Jones, L., & Clark, R. C. "Collaborating to Transform Nursing Care through Practice," Poster presented at: 2007 Nurse Faculty/ Nurse Executive Summit, Scottsdale, AZ.

 

Mayhew, Glen R.

Oral Presentation

  • National
  • Mayhew, G. R., & Cyplik, A., (2015, February 21). "Managing Assessment Data and Validating Meaningful Change," Oral Presentation presented at: From Mission to Action to Evidence: Empowering and Inclusive General Education Programs, American Association of Colleges and Universities, Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Intellectual Contributions

 

Arts and Sciences

 

Abdulahad, Asem I. (Assistant Professor)

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Hill, T. K., Abdulahad, A. I., Kelkar, S. S., Marini, F. C., Long, T. E., Provenzale, J. M., Mohs, A. M. (in press). Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Tumor Surgery. Bioconjugate Chemistry/American Chemical Society.

 

Dane, Francis C. (Associate Professor)

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Patel, D., Devereaux, R. S., Teaford, G., Dane, F. C., Parish, D. C., Waring, M., Kiefe, C.I. (in press). Medication Adherence Improves Shortly After Acute Coronary Syndrome Admission and Then Declines Over One Year: Findings from TRACE-CORE. Dallas, TX:  American Heart Association.

 

Dunn, Ashleigh P. (Assistant Professor)

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Dunn, A., Forscher, P. PKC activation decreases peripheral actin network density and increases central non-muscle Myosin II contractility in neuronal growth cones. Molecular Biology of the Cell.

 

Farrell PhD, Francis X. (Assistant Professor)

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Farrell, F. X. (2015). In Nina Tatevin (Ed.), Serum Inflammatory and Immune mediators are Elevated in Early Stage Diabetic Nephropathy (3rd ed., vol. 45). Houston, Texas:   Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine. www.annclinabsci.org

 

Houser, Sara R. (Assistant Professor)

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Houser, S. R. (in press). Microbiology Experiments: A Health Science Perspective. (7th Ed.), New York: McGraw Hill.

 

McNamara, John P.

Conference Proceedings

  • McNamara, J. P., Tousman, S. A. (2015). Interprofessional Education: How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate and Graduate Students. Blacskburg, VA: Virginia Tech Center for Instructional Design and Research.

 

Conference Proceedings

  • McNamara, J. P., Tousman, S. A. Interprofessional Education: How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate and Graduate. Collaboration Across Borders.

 

Prince PhD, Paula L. (Assistant Professor)

Conference Proceedings

  • Prince, P. L. Relevance of Medical Sociology to an Internal Medicine Residency Home Visit Program.

Conference Proceedings

  • Prince, P. L. Preventative Health and Homeless Women.

 

Steer, George A.

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Steer, G. A., Whiter, K. A. (in press). Peer assisted learning in anatomy & physiology II laboratory: an ultrahybrid design using health professions students. Respiratory Care.

 

Tousman, Stuart A. (Full Professor)

Conference Proceedings

  • McNamara, J. P., Tousman, S. A. (2015). Interprofessional Education: How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate and Graduate Students. Blacskburg, VA: Virginia Tech Center for Instructional Design and    Research.

Conference Proceedings

  • McNamara, J. P., Tousman, S. A. Interprofessional Education: How Unconventional Methodology Can Develop Interprofessionalism in Undergraduate and Graduate. Collaboration Across Borders.

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Tousman, S. A. Arts and Science Newsletter.

 

Watson, Courtney D. (Assistant Professor)

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Watson, C. D. (2015). City of Ladies. (1 Ed.) Per Contra: An International Journal of the Arts, Literature, and Ideas.

 

Whiter MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, Kimberly A. (Assistant Professor)

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Steer, G. A., Whiter, K. A. (in press). Peer assisted learning in anatomy & physiology II laboratory: an ultrahybrid design using health professions students. Respiratory Care.

 

Community Health Sciences

 

Harper, Thomas L.

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Harper, T. L. Fundamentals of Fire Fighter Skills. (Third Ed.), Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

 

Shomaker MA, Darrell K.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Hunt, H., Shomaker, D. K. (2016). That's What's Suppose to Happen:  A Mother's Reflection on a Young Daughter's Public Miscarriage. Women's Studies Quarterly. Special Issue SP16.

 

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Shomaker, D. K. (2015). In Eda Agascioglu (PhD) (Ed.), The Dead Body: Medicine's Secret Weapon (1st ed., vol. 11). Ankara: Cankaya University Journal of Humanities and   Social Sciences.

 

Nursing

 

Anderson, Martha S.

Book Chapters

  • Anderson, M. (in press). Healthy Aging: Clinical Guidelines for Advanced Practice Nurses. Chapter: Dementia. MCI, Alzheimer’s and Delirium. Lippincott.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Bankole, A., Anderson, M., Knight, A. Validation of Body Sensor Network Technology in the Detection of Agitation in Dementia. American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias. 27(5), pp. 346-354.

 

Hall, Kimberly B.

Books

  • Hall, K. B. Encyclopedia of Nursing Research.

 

Book Chapters

  • Hall, K. B. Encyclopedia of Nursing Leadership.

 

Lilley III, Larry L.

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Lilley, L. L. Abstract reviews for Carilion Clinic's Research day.

 

Porter, Ava G.

Conference Proceedings

  • Porter, A. G. In Cariliion Clinic (Ed.), Audience response system technology in nursing      education. (pp. p. 34). Roanoke: Cariliion Clinic, Book of abstracts: Research day 2010.

 

Thompson RN, MSN, Gelene T.

 

Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Thompson, G. T. Planning of live IPE 200 class.

 

Rehabilitation and Wellness

 

Krackow, Michael S.

Book Chapters

  • Krackow, M. S. Study Guide for the Physical Therapist Assistant’s Examination., Sag Harbor, NY: DWJ Books, LLC.

 

Polich, Susan M.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Sicat, B., Willet, R., Huynh, C., Polich, S. M., Mayer, S. Interprofessional education in a primary care teaching clinic: findings from a study involving pharmacy and medical       students. Journal of Interprofessional Care/informa Healthcare. Early Online. informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.3109/13561820.2013.829424

 

College Administration

 

Mayhew, Glen R.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Mayhew, G. R., Holdcraft, R. L. Impact of Tree Stand Fall Arrest Systems on Injuries      and Fatalities in Virginia 2000-2008. American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

 

Editorial and Review Activities

Arts and Sciences

Dane, Francis C.

Editorial Review Board Member, World Journal of Critical Care Medicine, Appointed.       

(March 7, 2011 - Present)

  • World Journal of Critical Care Medicine (World J Crit Care Med, WJCCM, online ISSN 2220-3141, DOI: 10.5492) is a monthly peer-reviewed, online, open-access (OA), journal supported by an editorial board consisting of experts in critical care medicine from various countries.
  • The biggest advantage of the OA model is that it provides free, full-text articles in PDF    and other formats for experts and the public without registration, which eliminates the obstacle that traditional journals possess and usually delays the speed of the    propagation and communication of scientific research results. The open access model has been proven to be an approach that may achieve the ultimate goal of the journals, i.e. the maximization of the value to the readers, authors and society. [from journal Web site]

 

Editorial Review Board Member, Critical Care, Appointed.

(2002 - Present)

  • Statistical Reviewer

 

Editorial Review Board Member, Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy (ASAP),

Appointed.

(2001 - Present)

  • Editorial Board Member: review manuscripts, advise Editor on scope and direction of journal

 

Nursing

 

Anderson, Martha S.

Editorial Review Board Member, Journal of Gerontological Nursing

  • 20 hours spent per year
  • Review journal articles

 

 

 

 

Clark, Warren G.

Editorial Review Board Member, Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, Appointed.

  • 25 hours spent per year.
  • (October 1998 - Present)

 

Rehabilitation and Wellness

 

Polich, Susan M.

Editorial Review Board Member, Teaching and Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal,

  • Appointed, 150 hours spent per year.
  • Review articles for submission; give general guidance to editors

 

 

Research Educational Program Update

It was a very exciting and productive year for the students participating in our Research Educational Program.   Bronson’s project was selected to be presented in the International Science Fair in Pittsburg, PA.  His project, along with 3 other student projects, was featured in the Roanoke Times article on May 10, 2015.   Congratulations to Bronson.

 Many of the students who participated in our program went on to prestigious schools including University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Yale, University of North Carolina, and Duke University just to name a few.  Several have come back to work or volunteer at the Carilion Research Laboratory over the summer.

We have a total of 7 students, either new or returning, in the fall.  Mentoring opportunities are available for faculty members at Carilion who have an interest in research and would like to participate and in this program.  Please contact Kristin Knight at 985-8013 for more information.

 

Research and Scholarship Council (RASCL)

RASCL stands for the Research and Scholarship Council. RASCL consists of teaching faculty, professional faculty/staff (yearly turnover), and administrators (Jefferson and Carilion-based). RASCL exists to promote research and scholarship within the JCHS community, and its visibility within Carilion Clinic, as well as regionally and nationally. RASCL supports research and scholarship activities of JCHS faculty, staff, and students by providing information regarding grantsmanship (possible grant sources, possible collaborators, grant writing workshops); and providing mentoring on all phases of the research and scholarship process including research design and statistics, manuscript preparation, and dissemination of findings (conference presentation and publications). RASCL also recommends policies related to research and scholarship to the College Administrative Team.

Until 2015, RASCL was responsible for planning and implementing the annual Jefferson College Research Day, where faculty and students displayed their research and scholarly work. In Spring of 2015, members of RASCL worked with Carilion OSP to plan the first comprehensive Carilion Clinic Research Day. This was a huge success and RASCL looks forward to working on the 2016 event!

 

Kimberly A. Whiter, M.S., MLS(ASCP) CM

Director of Faculty Development and Interprofessional Education
Jefferson College of Health Science
kawhiter@jchs.edu
office: 540-985-8106

 

A Short History Lesson on Patent Policy

By Robert Taylor

 

To avert serious and lasting damage to our innovation ecosystem and our most promising young companies, it may be helpful to consider some history that appears to have been forgotten. For 225 years, the U.S. patent system has been one of the crown jewels of American economic policy, providing incentives for the commitment of time and money to create the next generation of technology. The Patent Act was one of first pieces of legislation adopted in 1790 by the first Congress, reflecting the Founders’ considered and thoughtful balancing of two competing objectives – allowing free and unfettered use of information and ideas in the public domain while encouraging innovation through limited protection of new and useful inventions. Those twin objectives have long provided a framework for managing the set of rules we call patent law. The current Congress, however, seems determined to abandon, or at least weaken, the latter of those objectives – the use of patents as incentives to innovate.

Despite a major overhaul of the U.S. patent system only four years ago that included the creation of special procedures for challenging weak and invalid patents in the Patent Office, Congress is now pursuing legislation designed to make it more difficult, more risky and far more expensive to enforce all U.S. patents, even the best and strongest of patents on the most important inventions. H.R. 9 and S. 1137, both of which are currently working their way through the congressional process, reflect the agenda of some of the world’s largest corporations who want to make it more difficult for startups and small innovative companies to erode their markets with next generation technologies. Although members of Congress are being told that these bills will crack down on “patent trolls,” the reality is that the legislation will have less impact on NPEs than on companies trying to interest investors in funding the development of new drugs, new medical devices and myriad other breakthrough technologies.

Lost entirely in the current debate is the importance of patents to the entrepreneurial community that depends on them to justify the risks and resources needed to bring new products and services to market in the face of entrenched competition. Venture capital backed startups have accounted most of the growth in our economy for decades. Although a few startups, such as those that create clever marketing models or applications for smartphones, may not depend on technology patents for survival, for most innovative companies patents are a critical part of their business plans without which investors will not provide funding. Consider, for example, a surgical device that may take years to develop and get approved by the FDA. Without patents, these products are easily copied, severely devaluing the development effort. For investors, enforceable patents provide the only viable way to justify the commitment of money, time and effort needed to develop such a product. Countless innovative products across nearly every technology fall into the same category. The legislative debate, however, ignores this part of our economy in a misguided effort to “get the trolls.”

Innovation does not take place in a vacuum. It requires visionary people willing to give up more secure jobs and start companies that have a high probability of failure. It requires investors with a strong appetite for risk who are willing to invest in an often distant prospect of returns sufficient to justify the risk. For technologies having a long development cycle, these prerequisites require the security provided by patents to assure that others will not be permitted merely to copy new products and services.

Patents play their most significant role in the perception of others that infringement will be punished. If an entrenched incumbent believes that a startup will be unable to enforce its patents, the patents lose this deterrent impact and become just empty pieces of paper. The unavailability of enforcement as a practical option becomes an open invitation for competitors to misappropriate the technology represented by the patent. It is already prohibitively expensive for most small companies to enforce their patents except in the most urgent of circumstances, and the result is that, even without the pending legislation, large companies often infringe the patents of smaller ones with impunity. The proposed legislation will make it still more expensive to bring patent cases and will escalate the risk level in even trying.

This is where some history might be useful. Starting before World War II and continuing throughout the 1950s, 60s and 70s, short sighted and now discredited government antitrust policies, coupled with judicial hostility toward patent enforcement and patent licensing, converged to reduce the enforceability of patents and to restrict the ability of patent owners to license their inventions. The result: foreign competitors began to capture entire industries that should have been dominated by U.S. companies that had pioneered the relevant technologies. Color television, for example, was invented in the 1950s by American companies, most prominently RCA, GE and Zenith. Despite the U.S. having an enormous technological head start, by the mid-1970s the best-selling color television set in the world was Sony’s Trinitron and a dozen American manufacturers were on their way to ceding the color television market to Japan and Korea. Similarly, another U.S. company, Ampex, pioneered the first video recorders in the 1950s, but by the end of the 70s that industry was also dominated by Japanese companies, including Panasonic and Toshiba. Similar stories abounded during the 1970s, prompting President Ronald Reagan to appoint a Presidential Commission on Industrial Competitiveness to determine the causes. That Commission was headed by John Young, then CEO of Hewlett Packard, and included numerous leaders of American businesses.

The Commission’s Report, issued in 1985, analyzed this massive migration of technology and industry from the United States to Germany, Japan, Korea and elsewhere. While the migration was not traceable solely to our failure to enforce patents and encourage licensing, the Report concluded that the lack of meaningful intellectual property protection was one of the principal drivers and something that required correction. Some of the findings resonate as much today as they did back then:

“Protection is needed for intellectual property. Since technological innovation requires large investments of both time and money, the protection of our intellectual property is another task we should place on our competitive agenda. Research and development are always risky. If the developers of a new technology cannot be assured of gaining adequate financial benefits from its commercialization, they have few incentives to make the huge investments required.

Today, the need to protect intellectual property is greater than ever. A wave of commercial counterfeiting, copyright and design infringement, technology pirating, and other erosions of intellectual property rights is seriously weakening America’s comparative advantage in innovation….”

Fortunately, the aftermath was a happier story. In the early 1980s, the newly appointed Assistant Attorney General, William F. Baxter, reversed many of the DOJ polices of prior years to encourage patent ownership and licensing. In 1982, Congress created the Federal Circuit and gave it jurisdiction over most patent infringement cases, thus providing a new vibrancy and strength to our patent system and ushering in the most productive thirty year period in history. This explosion occurred across countless industries and almost all technologies. The intervening 30 years have been hands down the most productive the world has ever known. Computing, digital audio and video, synthetic fabrics, communications, material sciences, chemistry, biotechnology, small molecule pharmaceuticals, optics, alternative forms of energy – it would be difficult to identify a technology that has not advanced by an order of magnitude or more in the last thirty years. Can we say that all of this remarkable growth was attributable solely to the renewed enforcement of patents? Of course not. But neither can anyone argue that the patent system was irrelevant in bringing it about. We know intuitively that for many technologies, patents are an essential part of the innovation process. Without protection from copying, why would anyone go to the trouble of developing a new drug or new device that is easily copied by competitors? The copyist does not share any of the development costs that may have been incurred over a period of years and with millions of investor dollars.

Before broadly weakening the enforceability of all U.S. patents, Congress needs to reflect long and seriously on the potential consequences – some that may not become fully apparent for a decade or more. There is often a long lead time between the decline in investment in technology and its impact on our nation, but history has shown us that the impact is predictable and inevitable. Frivolous and unfounded patent cases may be a nuisance to some U.S. businesses, but the prospects of losing markets and millions of U.S. based jobs to foreign competitors is a far greater threat. It is critical that Congress get this right.

 

SPSS Application is Now Available

VTCSOM library is staffed Monday – Friday from 8 - 5 p.m.  If faculty researchers need after-hours access, please contact James Keith, VTC Senior Director at 526-2527 or jgkeith@carilionclinic.org .

SPSS Basic v. 22 is installed on one public workstation in VTCSOM Health Sciences Library:

  • Clean Slate is installed on all public workstations--this is software that prevents files from being saved to the hard drive.  Whenever the computer is restarted, all SPSS data is erased.
  • Researchers are encouraged to bring portable storage media or save to their P-drive.

SPSS Basic v 22 is also installed on one loaner laptop. 

  • Researchers may borrow the loaner laptop for 1 week.  If they need it for an additional week, they need to contact me.
  • Researchers may sign on to Windows with their Carilion Active Directory username and password. 
  • Although they can save to the laptop's hard-drive, researchers are encouraged to use portable storage media or save to their P-drive.

View the SPSS Statistics Flyer (pdf)

Any questions, please contact me.

Margarite (Rita) McCandless M.L.S.
Clinical Research Librarian, Carilion Clinic Health Sciences Libraries
Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
2 Riverside Circle Ste M110C, Roanoke VA 24016
OFC: 540.526.2570 (82570) MOBILE:  540.728.0280
mjmccandless@carilionclinic.org
http://medicine.vtc.vt.edu/campus/library/

 

 

Research Seminars/Meetings

The Office of Continuing Professional Development is pleased to announce the start of a revised and updated Research Series for Carilion Clinic faculty. We have collaborated with the Carilion Clinic Research and Development office as well as other departments across the medical center to come up with a brand new series which is designed to educate participants on a wide variety of topics related to research! This two year series now offers a mixture of in-class sessions and online courses inside the Cornerstone on Demand system. You can attend as few or as many of these sessions as you would like. Completing 80% of all sessions (both online and in-person workshops) will earn you a Certificate of Achievement in Research.

The first session was held on November 25, 2014 and the remaining sessions will continue to follow every other month until September 16, 2016.

For in-person workshops, CME credits are available for everyone in attendance, AND lunch will be provided to the first 20 people who arrive. You may also feel free to bring your own lunch.

Upcoming Sessions:
All in-person sessions are located at CRMH in the ED Conference Room (1 South), from 12:00-1:00 pm

  • July 14, 2015: Overview of Statistical Applications, Part 1. Presented by Katherine Shaver
  • September 8, 2015: Overview of Statistical Applications, Part 2. Presented by Katherine Shaver
  • November 10, 2015: IRB & Research Ethics. Presented by Chuck Hite
  • Cornerstone On Demand Modules:
    • Tips for Writing Better Research
    • Introduction to Clinical Research
    • Clinical Researchers Roles and Responsibilities
    • Informed Consent Process
    • Tips for Using Health Sciences Library

To register for upcoming Research Series Sessions, or for a complete list of Research Series Sessions, please contact the Office of Continuing Professional Development at (540) 853-0131 or Continuing_Professional_Development-OPSA-EDU@carilionclinic.org