close to home

why am I like Seth Godin?

I never thought that my ideas about how folks become excellent physicians would correspond to advice from a social media marketing guru. However, last week, when I was perusing Seth Godin’s blog I came across a post entitled “Why ask why?” and was amazed to find that our philosophical approaches are almost identical.

Seth believes that “why?” is the most important question, and not asked often enough. I thoroughly agree

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the five bravest things our nurses do

We are coming to the end of “the week of the nurse” and I have come to the end of another week on service on the pediatric floor.

It is embarrassing to me that I don’t ALWAYS stop to thank the nurses I work with for their bravery.

What? Bravery? What’s that got to do with nursing?

Nurses give out medicines, tend to patients’ and parents’ needs, and carry out doctors’ “orders” RIGHT? Well, yes, but there is so much more, especially on a pediatric unit (and probably on adult units as well, but I can only write about what I know).

So this post is dedicated to the dedication and bravery of our pediatric nurses and the wonderful things they helped me and the rest of the health care team do this past week.

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the hidden academic

There is something that most of us “academic types” do that often goes unrecognized, and is almost always undervalued. However, it is a big part of my life, and I thought you might enjoy learning about it. Of course you might think it’s total nonsense, and that’s OK too. Just bear with me for a few moments.

Are you trying to guess what I am thinking? What this post is about?

It’s about reviewing manuscripts that have been submitted for possible publication in medical and scientific journals.

This is the story of PEER REVIEW

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mother versus baby

The tragedy of neonatal abstinence is all around us.

This video was forwarded to me by one of our operations efficiency engineers who works with the physicians and nurses in our neonatal intensive care unit. Our approach to the treatment of these fragile babies is slightly different, as we attempt to get the infants and moms together, preferably at home after their initial stabilization. Nonetheless, the description of the suffering these babies go through is very clear.

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my social media speaking debut

Many of you are aware that I was attending Social Slam this Friday, and that I got to give a 10-minute presentation about some events that came together early on. You have all heard the story of our Vaccine Town Hall, so I won't repeat it here.

I was planning to talk about the conference, and how wonderful it was, but it seems that one of the attendees has beat me to it. So I invite you to visit Chris Craft's blog and read the story.

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Is it really OK to sleep with your baby?

Here is a post I am most eager for you all to read. It is submitted by Vanessa Freville, a pediatric nurse practitioner at Carilion Clinic Children’s Hospital. She is a former PICU nurse, pediatric Emergency Department NP, and currently works with the hospitalist group in the in-patient area. Vanessa is very passionate about keeping our infants and children safe. She is an active member of the Roanoke SafeKids alliance. In honor of SIDS awareness week, she wrote this post to encourage conversation and exploration of the practice of SAFE SLEEP in infants. I suspect this one may engender many comments. Please let us know your opinions, positive or negative.

How many parents have shared their own bed or fallen asleep with their baby at some point?

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what do you think about social media in medicine?

In a recent post I discussed some of the reasons why physicians like myself might choose to blog, tweet and communicate via Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Plus. As I mentioned then, there is a bunch of controversy over the use of social media communication in the field of medicine. Those who don’t use it don’t see why anyone should use it. Some use it inappropriately. Some break ethical standards, or laws such as HIPAA by divulging protected private information about patients.

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the anatomy of a kidnapping

Yesterday, Friday, April 6, I was kidnapped by Dr. Evil. The kidnapping occurred at approximately 9 am on Friday, and I was released around 4 pm that day. The hero of the day, who caught and captured Dr. Evil (with a bit of help from federal agents) was Eric, an 8-year old child cared for by our pediatric cardiology group over many years. He is hale and hearty, despite his "zipper:" the scar that runs up and down his chest along the center of his breastbone. His memento of three separate cardiac operations performed before his 5th birthday.

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why do doctors blog?

There are many questions that people ask when they find out that I am engaged in social media. They seem incredulous that I would spend my time blogging or tweeting instead of ....what? For me, blogging and tweeting are part of the activities I do when I am NOT engaged in every day medical work. In other words, I am not doing this instead of seeing a patient. I am writing when I am either in my academic office or at home, or maybe while I am traveling. Many folks don't seem to understand some of the things that might motivate a physician to spend "free" time in this way. Why bother?

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my first guest post

I would like to invite all of my readers to wander over to the Social Slam web site to read my latest post. This is the beginning of the story I will be telling in my ten allotted minutes during Social Slam 2012 on April 27 in Knoxville. It chronicles the events that lead up to the Vaccine Town Hall held last fall here in Roanoke.

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